No. 9 Park

Compared to prolific Boston chef Barbara Lynch’s other, newer outposts (think Menton, Sportello, B&G), No. 9 Park seems different, a bit more well-worn. Sure, we’re in a city of new spots, where two decades of churning out meals makes a restaurant seem ancient (No. 9 opened in 1998). But it’s also got something to do with the coziness of Beacon Hill, the proximity of Boston Common, and the Massachusetts State House. It might not dabble in the tapas, nor the industrial-chic, but No. 9 Park feels like it belongs here, like it’s not going anywhere. It’ll be there when you need a spot for that fancy business lunch, it’ll be there when you want that romantic dinner, it’ll be there in the after-work hours when you need a drink.

Exterior of No. 9 Park

Nothing well-worn about the menu, though. It’s classically influenced at heart—fancy loins and legs, seared foie gras topping beloved dishes like Prune-Stuffed Gnocchi—but seasonal, local ingredients (including truffles, whenever they’re available) keep the variation and creativity flowing. Dishes can be enjoyed via a six-course chef’s tasting menu, as well as a la carte. Everything’s available in both the formal dining room and at the bar (along with a bar-only menu serving smaller plates of equally careful crafting).

Prune stuffed gnocchi from No. 9 Park

While the food is stunning, the wine list—brilliantly curated by Wine Director Cat Silirie—is equally worth a mention. A mix of international and domestic Old World varietals, the substantial assemblage comes in a binder and covers any range of tastes. Knowledgeable servers are on hand to suggest pairings for the tasting menuor a la carte items. We imagine they’re ready to recommend other libations, too, considering Lynch’s restaurants have been credited for jumpstarting the craft cocktail movement in our city. Need proof? Just go after work sometime, and join the crowd. It’ll be there.

Food from No. 9 Park

Like cocktails? So does No. 9 Park. So much, in fact, that a two-hour cocktail class is offered on a Sunday afternoon each month (drinking and bar snacks included). Reserve a seat online.

No. 9 Park’s tasting and a la carte menus are both available at the bar—along with the bar-only menu. If you’re looking for a more casual drop-in with the same great service, give bar seating a try.

Every Sunday, Barbara Lynch’s love for classic French cooking is on display with some extra menu items—all the terrine and poulet needed to satisfy your Francophone instincts.

Must Haves

  • Softly seared foie gras and delicate, pillowy gnocchi filled with sweet and earthy prune puree, all topped with a buttery, caramel-like sauce.

  • When fresh truffles are in season, it might be a plain risotto, it might be a tagliatelle. Whatever; order it.

  • Curated and varied-selections range from local to imported, soft to hard, raw and pasteurized. Goat, sheep, and cow all make an appearance. Cheese plates are served with unique crackers, nuts, and accompaniments.

  • Switched up every two weeks, this six-course menu usually combines some of the restaurant's classic staples with seasonal creations. Wine pairings are optional; choose your level of luxury.

Fun Fact

No. 9 Park’s most famous and long-lived original cocktail—the Palmyra—is simple enough: 2 ounces vodka, ¾ ounces mint-infused simple syrup, ¾ ounces lime juice.

Tastes of No. 9 Park

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