Little Big Diner

There’s a certain playfulness about Little Big Diner. It beckons you in with a grinning orange octopus floating above the front door. It makes you smile to slurp on umami-loaded ramen while staring at a whimsical blue mural of the soup on an exposed brick wall. It sweet-talks you into willingly subjecting yourself to rush-hour traffic to Newton, just for a fix.

The vibe might not be too serious—but the food is. With a focus on small details, owner David Punch (of restaurants Sycamore and Buttonwood) and head chef Greg Stalilonis take perfectly delicious dishes into groan-worthy territory. House-made spicy mayo is bound with miso paste rather than mustard, and spiked with sambal oelek, the Southeast Asian chili garlic paste, making it a perfect dipper for shatteringly crisp Japanese fried chicken. Even dried shrimp—an Asian grocery store staple—are oven-toasted, which transforms them into intensely flavored Rice Krispies-of-the-sea before they’re scattered atop the Green Papaya Salad.

But most people come for the ramen. It’s based on a broth that rolls at a hard boil for six hours before being topped with rich chashu pork, or chicken thighs, or chili ground pork. (Or, in the case of the Chef’s Ultra Ramen, all three at once.)

It all sounds very decadent, and it is. But the kitchen knows just how to balance out richness with a well-placed scallion salad on the fried chicken; or pressed cucumbers and spicy radishes on an egg-topped brown rice bowl; or the acidic funk of homemade kimchi on a big bowl of alkaline noodles. And yes, there’s always the sparkling tuna poke (and that insanely delicious papaya salad) if you’re looking to eat light.

Did we mention all of this happens in a tiny slip of a suburban restaurant? There are just 22 seats, and no, you can’t make a reservation. But while waiting for table you can sip a draft craft cocktail—a clever way for beverage manager Scott Shoer to adapt to a tiny bar. From the Cold Tea—a dangerously refreshing blend of tequila, mezcal, yuzu, sake, and green tea—to local brews from Night Shift and Trillium, to an unfiltered sake brewed by Dovetail in Waltham, there’s something for everyone on this wee but well-curated list.

Punching well above its weight, Little Big Diner can go toe-to-toe with any hip hot spot within Boston city limits. Forget the school system; we’re moving to the ‘burbs just for the food.

Don’t be deterred by the wait list. Head across the street for an excellent cocktail at Comedor, a Chilean-American spot with a great bar. LBD will give you a call when your table is ready.

The restaurant resets for dinner between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., so don’t plan on arriving for that very late lunch.

Customize your ramen bowl with a menu of add-ons like smoked honey corn, marinated shiitakes, butter cubes, chili crisp oil, and more.

Must Haves

  • Think salad can’t be exciting? Think again. This one is a pleasurable punch to the taste buds: Thai bird chili paste coats the shredded fruit mixed with garlic, citrus, peanuts, and dried shrimp.

  • The name says it all. Savory broth, shoyu chicken thigh, chili ground pork, porky chashu, and springy alkaline noodles. The gut bomb gains some balance from white kimchi, sprouts, and scallions.

  • The shoyu chicken thighs you loved in the Chef’s Ultra Ramen also come deep fried in a starchy sweet potato coating, which gives them extra crunch. A slick of the house-made mayo and a topping of scallion salad gild the lily.

  • Warning! This will ruin every (ubiquitous) pale imitation of a poke bowl. It’s nori, sambal oelek, and brown rice, plus pristine fish that’s allowed to shine.

Fun Fact

Head chef Greg Stalilonis started his career at a software company but quickly realized that it wasn’t the life for him. His first job out of culinary school was working for Ming Tsai at Blue Ginger (which explains a lot).

Tastes of Little Big Diner

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